BV Supplement

September 2019 Vol. 7 No. 3

Author: By Brooke M. Faught, DNP, WHNP-BC, NCMP, IF

Brooke M. Faught

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent vaginal infection. Although BV is not classified as a sexually transmitted infection, it is considered a sexually associated infection. As such, it may be possible to reduce the chance of developing it or at least reduce the rate of recurrences . . .

September 2019 Vol. 7 No. 3

Author: By Beth Kelsey, EdD, APRN, WHNP-BC, FAANP

What can a nurse practitioner do for a woman who has been treated “countless times” for BV?

Factors that alter the vaginal microbiome increase the risk for bacterial vaginosis (BV) by causing a shift in the vaginal microbiota from lactobacillus-dominated bacteria to a variable mixture of anaerobic and facultative . . .

September 2019 Vol. 7 No. 3

Author: By Beth Kelsey, EdD, APRN, WHNP-BC, FAANP

Most women experience at least one vaginal infection characterized by vaginal discharge, itching, and/or odor during their lives. In women who present with these vaginal symptoms, the three most common conditions are bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. In some cases, more than one vaginal infection is present. A . . .

September 2019 Vol. 7 No. 3

Author: By Diane Bruessow, PA-C, MPAS, DFAAPA

The author describes the relatively increased prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women who have sex with women (WSW) and the concordance of vaginal flora between monogamous sexual partners. She suggests that these findings may represent sexual transmission of BV from one woman to another, not merely an association. She . . .