News

A new study published in Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery found that decreased pelvic floor strength after childbirth is 2.5 times more likely to affect women over age 25 years than younger women (Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg 2017; 23: 136-140).
“In multivariate analysis, age alone was . . .

Anti-inflammatory diets — which tend to be high in vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains — could boost bone health and prevent fractures in some women, a new study suggests.

Researchers examined data from the landmark Women’s Health Initiative to compare levels of inflammatory elements in the diet to bone . . .

 

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM) have discovered a possible new explanation for female infertility. Thanks to cutting-edge microscopy techniques, they observed for the first time a specific defect in the eggs of older mice. This defect may also be found in the eggs . . .

Blood tests to diagnose and monitor rheumatoid arthritis may be thrown off by obesity in women, a new study suggests.

“Physicians might assume that high levels of inflammation mean that a patient has rheumatoid arthritis or that their rheumatoid arthritis requires more treatment, when in fact a mild increase in . . .

Early intervention with a combination of antiandrogen and insulin-sensitizing agents in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may help improve their fertility and overall health later on, a small new study suggests.

The findings were presented April 4 at ENDO 2017: The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting by Lourdes Ib . . .

Frequent hot flashes in younger middle-aged women may be a sign of a higher risk of vascular disease, researchers found.

Writing in Menopause, the authors examined 272 non-smoking women ages 40 to 60 years. They examined their endothelial cell function and the effect of hot flashes on the . . .

When it comes to oral contraceptives, women often hear about the increased cancer risk they pose. A new study, however, finds that the using birth control pills may protect against certain cancers for at least 30 years.

From an analysis of more than 46,000 women, researchers from the University . . .

Purdue researchers are developing a test strip, similar to the common pregnancy test, to detect cervical cancer and eventually other types of cancer and diseases.

Cervical cancer, the fourth most common type of cancer for women, is often detected too late, especially among women living in poor countries. The World . . .

Having too much sugar, salt, or fat in your diet can raise your risk for certain diseases. Healthy eating can lower your risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other health conditions. A healthy eating plan emphasizes vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products; includes . . .

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can be tricky in older age. They’re not always as easy to spot or treat as in youth. And the decades-long approach to treatment is changing. “We’ve been hasty in using antibiotics, and we’re learning there are significant consequences that can range . . .

January was Cervical Health Awareness Month, and this year, that designation held special significance for Nimmi Ramanujam, professor of biomedical engineering and global health and director of the Center for Global Women’s Health Technologies.

Since 2012, she and her research team have been developing and testing a portable colposcope . . .

For patients with triple-negative breast cancer and BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, current treatment options may at times be limited; currently, there are no specific treatments for BRCA1/BRCA2-mutated cancers that address the genetic defects seen in these cancers. However, there is growing interest in the use of Poly (ADP . . .

There is insufficient evidence to recommend for or against pelvic exams for most gynecologic conditions among asymptomatic women of reproductive age, said the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Other than cervical cancer, gonorrhea and chlamydia, which have been addressed in separate recommendation statements, the USPSTF cited “insufficient evidence” to . . .

A minimally invasive procedure for uterine fibroids may be “under-used” in U.S. hospitals, compared with surgery, a new study suggests.

The study looked at a national sample of hospitals and found that fewer fibroid patients are undergoing hysterectomy — surgical removal of the uterus.

But hysterectomy remains much more . . .

Being overweight or obese is an established risk factor for urinary incontinence, but a recent study indicates that body composition may also play a role. A multicenter team of researchers examined data from 1,475 women enrolled in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. The participants ranged in age . . .

The Inside Knowledge campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. Inside Knowledge encourages women to pay attention to their bodies, so they can recognize any warning signs and seek medical care.

New television and radio public service announcements in English . . .

In honor of Women’s History Month, Healthy Women put the spotlight on 10 women (but there are so many more!) who made important contributions to prioritizing women’s health.

1. Clara Barton, nurse/educator (1821–1912) 
Barton founded the American Red Cross in 1881. Since then, the organization has . . .

The determination of the precise frequency of adnexal masses is impossible as some adnexal tumors go undiagnosed. A variety of age groups need to be considered while estimating the clinical significance of adnexal masses.

Children to adolescents
Nearly 80% of ovarian cysts in girls under 9 years are malignant and . . .

The triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) pipeline is transforming, experts say, with the potential additions of immunotherapy and PARP inhibitors. These agents are being explored both as monotherapy and in combination regimens with standard chemotherapy options.

At the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, treatment with pembrolizumab (Keytruda) continued to . . .

Postmenopausal women with vulvar and vaginal atrophy reported high satisfaction and acceptability with vaginal estradiol softgel capsules compared with previously used therapies to treat their symptoms, study data show.

“[Vulvar and vaginal atrophy] is a chronic condition associated with genitourinary syndrome of menopause and affects 50% to 70% of postmenopausal . . .

WASHINGTON—Doctors working on the front lines of the nation’s heroin epidemic may be getting some fresh troops starting in 2017—battle-ready health professionals such as Danielle Eddings.

Eddings is a nurse practitioner in Springfield, Mo., eager to take advantage of a new federal law that will allow . . .

Medical Therapy for Uterine Fibroids Draws Nearer as Phase 2 Trial Brings Promising Results

Women with large uterine fibroids suffer with many quality-of-life issues, including limitations on work, travel, hobbies and sexuality. Unfortunately, our treatment options are primarily surgical ‒ hysterectomy or myomectomy. There is a real need for . . .