Pregnancy and Postpartum

June 2019 Vol. 7 No. 2

Author: By Jennifer Fredrickson, DNP, FNP-BC; Lynn Kirkland, DNSc, WHNP-BC; and Karen McCarty, PhD, MPH, MSN, CRNP

Women’s health behaviors during pregnancy may negatively or positively affect maternal and fetal/neonatal outcomes.1 Health behaviors during pregnancy that are likely to lead to positive outcomes—that is, health-promoting behaviors—include obtaining early prenatal care; acquiring pregnancy/childbirth education; adhering to nutritional and weight-gain guidelines . . .

Author: By Melissa Schenkman, MPH, MSJ

About one out of every nine expectant mothers in the United States experiences symptoms of postpartum depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The impact not only can affect the mother, but also the health of her child. In a PCORI-funded study, Darius Tandon, PhD, and . . .

May 2016 Vol. 4 No. 2

Author: Joanne B. Stevens, PhD, WHNP-BC, ARNP; Elizabeth Cooper, CNM, EdD; and Stasha Roberts, MSN, ARNP

Managing the prenatal care of adolescents is both challenging and rewarding. Given adolescents’ developmental needs, group prenatal care (GPC) such as that modeled after Centering- Pregnancy is particularly well suited to members of this age group. The authors share their strategies for providing developmentally appropriate GPC for adolescents.
Most females . . .

May 2016 Vol. 4 No. 2

Author: Amy J. Levi, PhD, CNM, WHNP-BC and Tara Cardinal, MN, CNM, ARNP

Early pregnancy loss (EPL), or miscarriage, is a common phenomenon in pregnancy; up to 30% of pregnancies result in miscarriage in women who have identified themselves as being pregnant.1 Various treatment modalities can be used to assist women who have experienced EPL, including expectant management, pharmacologic treatment, and vacuum . . .

February 2016 Vol. 4 No. 1

Author: By Suzanne F. Foley, PhD, WHNP-BC, RN

The postpartum period, defined traditionally as the first 6-8 weeks after birth, is a time of rapid change for new mothers and their families. Mothers are not only recovering physically but also making psychosocial adjustments related to their family role and relationships. In addition, mothers are adding or refining . . .