Professional Development

Addressing women’s healthcare needs in the U.S. military

Greetings to all our readers from the Policy Chair and Treasurer-Elect of the NPWH Board of Directors. Before you read my first Policy & practice points column, in which I aim to provide insight into policies affecting women who serve in the military from the perspective of a woman serving in the military, I want to introduce myself. I am a women’s health nurse practitioner (WHNP) and a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Air Force (USAF). I have 13 years’ experience serving in the military as a WHNP. I have served in multiple locations, including highly operational positions where I have supported military women worldwide. I now serve in the largest research organization in the USAF, where I am developing solutions to better incorporate women into the armed services. Continue reading »

Professional Development: Creating an Award-WInning Poster

first place nurse practioner posterBy Beth Kelsey, EdD, APRN, WHNP-BC, FAANP

Have you recently completed your research study or quality improvement (QI) project, submitted an abstract for conference presentation consideration, and been accepted for a poster presentation? If so, congratulations! Presenting a poster is an excellent venue for disseminating your research and project outcomes to colleagues. Poster presentations, more so than podium presentations, provide an opportunity to interact with individual viewers and with small groups of conference participants. If you are new to presenting, poster format can be less intimidating than standing in front of a large audience. In addition, the one-on-one contacts you can make with a poster presentation are a great way to network with others interested in your topic and to explore possible next steps in your scholarly and professional endeavors. Continue reading »

The pelvic health and wellness program: A niche clinical entity

In today’s healthcare climate, women’s health nurse practitioners (WHNPs) and other NPs providing healthcare for women are in a unique position, as front-line providers, to develop and implement a comprehensive, conservative, community-based pelvic health and wellness program (PHWP) within their chosen practice settings. The PHWP provides screening, assessment, and management of pelvic floor disorders (Table 1). These disorders include urinary incontinence (UI), overactive bladder (OAB), pelvic organ prolapse, chronic pelvic pain, and sexual dysfunction.1 The PHWP, an innovative, nontraditional, niche offering, can provide a much-needed clinical service in the community, broaden and enhance an NP’s own practice potential, and create a sound business venture to increase practice revenue. This program is a win-win situation because, with proper diagnosis and treatment, more than 90% of women with bladder or pelvic disorders can experience great improvement or a remission of their symptoms.

The healthcare landscape

The time is right; the need is now! Demographic trends are changing the nature of the healthcare landscape. Although overtaken by the Millennials in population, the number of Baby Boomers (persons born between 1946 and 1964) who are entering the 65+ age group is still increasing; the nation’s 65-and-older population grew from 44.7 million in 2013 to 46.2 million in 2014.2 Although people are living longer than ever before, many of them spend the extra years coping with the burden of chronic conditions such as diabetes and UI.3 However, many active women of today will not settle for wearing diapers or pads as the solution to their bladder problems, and will proactively seek help.4 And many Millennials want to make sure that they won’t suffer the consequences of poor pelvic health that their mothers and grandmothers endured. Prenatal and postpartum programs to restore the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) are both part of the larger PHWP.

Although many women seek professional care for bladder and pelvic problems, others are too afraid, ashamed, or embarrassed to do so. They feel that they have no place to go, and no one to turn to for help. Instead, they sit at home wearing diapers or pads. They fear that the only treatment is surgery and are unaware that conservative measures are available. But if their healthcare provider’s office offered a PHWP, they could avail themselves of the evaluation and treatment they need. That’s where you come into the picture.

Two models: Intrapreneur and entrepreneur

A PHWP can be developed via an intrapreneurial or an entrepreneurial approach. Intrapreneurial NPs, on their own initiative, approach the physicians/partners in the practice with the idea of establishing a PHWP and outline a plan that would transform the idea into a worthy and profitable undertaking. If the physicians/partners approve the plan, then they take responsibility for providing financial and administrative support for the program’s implementation.5 In these situations, the NPs become the program’s managers and take full responsibility  for implementing all facets of it.

This packaging of existing services into a focused  PHWP enhances overall care. Because of the downstream effect of the presence of the PWHP, the general patient base of the practice will likely increase. The woman with UI who is sitting at home with a pad will see that she is not alone, that she has a place to go, and that she has a provider who can address her  problem. Another plus for the practice is that the PWHP provides an internal surgical referral base for patients who prefer the option of surgery over more conservative approaches. Establishment of a PHWP enables the practice to promote the new program, burnishing the favorable image of the practice and increasing its visibility within the community. As I said, it’s a win-win for everyone.

Entrepreneurs, in contrast to intrapreneurs, not only conceive the innovative ideas surrounding the development and establishment of a PWHP, but they also organize, operate, finance, and assume the ris for the new business venture on their own, working outside an existing organizational structure.6 Entrepreneurship is hard work, but well worth the effort, for individuals with an adventurous spirit and the personal and professional resources to support it. An entrepreneurial independent practice requires more financial resources and time and has more potential risks than does the intrapreneurial model, but it also offers greater potential rewards.

Engaging in an intrapreneurial or entrepreneurial enterprise is not for everyone. As with any business venture, NPs must perform the necessary analysis to determine whether this pursuit is right for them. Table 2 lists potential reimbursements from women who progress through the PHWP, as well as costs associated with setting up a PHWP. The start-up costs are relatively low compared with the dramatically higher practice revenue.7 Understanding the basics of coding is essential to both models.8 Medicare and most insurance companies reimburse for assessments, treatments, and procedures done in a PHWP. ICD-10 changes have had little effect on these billing practices. However, NPs need to learn how to get reimbursed and how to maximize those reimbursements, as well as learn what it takes to operate a business and write grants for startup costs. And they will need to develop and establish a patient base and referral sources—the keys to success.

A PHWP can be established in settings other than offices and clinics. For example, intrapreneurial NPs who work in nursing homes or extended-care facilities can pursuethis goal as well.

Strategic enhancements

Whether NPs choose an intrapreneurial or an entrepreneurial approach, they will find that a PHWP can:

Dramatically increase practice revenue. For example, the program can generate $1,000-$2,500 for each patient who progresses through the program (6-8 visits) and gross $100,000-$250,000 a year per 100 patients (not including advanced procedures/testing such as pessary insertion or urodynamic testing);

Recapture monies lost from Medicare cutbacks by offering a program that is procedurally base with a history of proven reimbursement from Medicare;

Provide a lucrative service line to meet the pelvic health needs of women throughout the lifespan, but particularly of the emerging Baby Boomer generation;

Be current and competitive by offering a PHWP;

Package resources and enhance and merge existing

service lines to create a structured, step-bystep program of pelvic healthcare;

Increase utilization of existing resources such as ultrasonography, bladder scans, and laboratory services;

Provide a portal to other services that the practice may offer;

Establish a niche as the premier source of conservative pelvic healthcare in your area;

Increase the practice’s surgical referral base by recruiting women through the conservative arm who decide on a surgical alternative;

Enhance quality of life for women experiencing pelvic dysfunction; and

Enhance marketing opportunities and increase visibility and viability of your practice by offering an exciting new program that can be promoted in the community.7

Timing

Timing is everything. The Affordable Care Act provides two billable opportunities for the integration of pelvic health assessment into a pelvic health practice in the form of preventive teaching and a comprehensive screen. These opportunities are the annual wellness visit under Medicare and the well-woman visit for all other women.

For the first time, two major physician organizations have recommended that first-line therapies for UI and OAB be conservative rather than surgical. The American College of Physicians recommends education, pelvic floor exercises, timed voiding, and fluid managment for UI.9 The American Urological Association offers similar guidelines for OAB.10 These recommendations are well within the scope of practice for NPs.

Financials

At the Health & Continence Institute (HCI), gross revenue is $1,000-$2,500 as each woman progresses through the program. This revenue range does not include fees for pessary insertion. An important aspect is that NPs would be recruiting patients not for just a single visit but, rather, for entry into the PHWP, where they would remain for a series of 6-8 visits over 3-4 months. Startup costs are covered after 4-6 patients complete the program.

When you consider the return on investment, startup costs are strikingly low. These costs depend on the type of model you pursue. Intrapreneurs can easily insert their program into the daily routine of their home office. Only one room is needed for 2-3 days a week. Entrepreneurs have the added challenge of setting up a new office and purchasing equipment and supplies.11 Grants for this purpose are available from organizations such as The Simon Foundation for Continence and The National Associationfor Incontinence. Adding only two new patients a week to the program can lead to gross revenue of $100,000-$250,000. But the best news is that the conservative measures implemented in a PHWP greatly enhance quality of life for women who previously had few options.

Conclusion

The number of women who have pelvic health problems will only increase as Baby Boomers age.12 Pelvic health conditions have been neglected for years, even though they comprise 2 of the 10 most common chronic conditions in U.S. women—OAB and UI.13 These two conditions affect a higher percentage of persons of all age groups than do hypertension, depression, and diabetes.13WHNPs and other NPs caring for women are well positioned to champion, initiate, and implement a PHWP within a practice setting as intrapreneurs or entrepreneurs. An NP entrepreneur is no longer an oxymoron! In fact, it is somewhat surprising that there has not been a groundswell of practitioners wanting to provide this niche clinical service. A large part of the problem may be that practitioners have nowhere to turn to for practical advice or training for themselves!

On a more personal level, many NPs have reached out to the HCI to share that, at this point in their careers, they are seeking new challenges and causes to champion. Many of them are also looking for potential opportunities and ways to meet the needs of women with pelvic health concerns who do not know where to turn. Even more NPs are looking for ways to provide a niche service that is also financially advantageous for them.

Whether readers want to proceed as intrapreneurs or entrepreneurs, they are about to embark on an exciting, rewarding, and lucrative career opportunity. Good luck! =

Helen A. Carcio is founder and director of the Health & Continence Institute, where she independently manages her pelvic health center in Deerfield, Massachusetts. Readers can contact her at the HCI website. She was an Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in the nurse practitioner program. The author states that she does not have a financial interest in or other relationship with any commercial product named in this article.

References

1. Haylen BT, de Ridder D, Freeman RM, et al. An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint report on the terminology for female pelvic floor dysfunction. Neurourol Urodyn.

Formation of a peer review group for advanced practice nurses: Learning from and with colleagues

In 1996, Dr. Els Borst, former Minister of Health of the Netherlands, proposed that specially trained master’s-prepared nurses assume certain tasks of physicians in order to help meet the growing need for healthcare in the midst of a physician shortage. In light of the increased number of elderly and chronically ill patients today, this need is even more pressing.1  The consequence of Dr. Borst’s proposal was the inauguration of the first Master’s in Advanced Nursing Practice (MANP) program in Groningen, the Netherlands, at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences in 1997.

Since that time, the training and the work accountability of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the Netherlands have been extended. A major change occurred in March 2009, when Dutch APNs were granted official registration numbers and legal title protection. Nurses can be registered as APNs only after earning a master’s degree from a certified university and undergoing training on the job at a certified healthcare institute with a certified medical and nursing trainer.

Dutch APNs can be registered in one of five nursing specialties: (1) acute care in somatic disorders, (2) intensive care in somatic disorders, (3) chronic care in somatic disorders, (4) preventive care in somatic disorders and (5) mental health. Like physicians, APNs must attend conferences offering staff development workshops and be actively employed for at least 24 hours a week. In 2014, more than 2,500 APNs were registered in the Netherlands.2

After initial registration, APNs must re-register every 5 years to maintain an active license. Since 2010, one of the requisites for re-registration has been participation in peer review (PR). Guidelines of the Dutch Nursing Specialty Registration Board (DNSRB) require APNs to participate in a PR group (PRG) for at least 40 hours per 5-year period.3 In addition, to ensure competence and continuous professional development, periodic self-appraisal and peer feedback must be in place for all levels of nursing.4 

Defining peer review

Peer review is a systematic process by which one assesses, monitors, and makes judgments about the quality of care provided to patients by others, as measured against established standards of practice. 5,6 Nursing PR is an evaluation of one’s professional nursing practice, including identification of opportunities to improve care, by persons with the appropriate expertise to perform the evaluation.7 Because they undergo PR, APNs are a group of healthcare providers (HCPs) whose personal competencies in various nursing specialties are compared— with those of other APNs and with objective criteria—with the aim of improving daily practice.3  PR, recognized as a measure of accountability and a means to evaluate and improve practice,4  enhances development of the APN profession and improves the quality of patient care.

Peer review has multiple benefits for APNs. It facilitates an open and safe learning environment. It provides APNs with an opportunity to reflect on questions and problems together. Because of the interactive setting, APNs invariably learn something new.8PR even offers APNs a break in an otherwise hectic workday. PR can help APNs evaluate the quality of care they have delivered, and gain insight into their greatest strengths and weaknesses as HCPs. With feedback and recommendations from the group, APNs can gain new knowledge and improve their skills.

Creating and working as a PRG

Because the APN profession is relatively new in the Netherlands, the nursing education department of the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam had no experience in starting or structuring a PRG. Five years ago, five pioneering APNs working on an internal medicine unit decided to create such a PRG. These APNs found several examples of PRGs in the literature and took the initiative in creating a framework, based on non-empirical research, that took into account the criteria requisites of the DNSRB.

To initiate an effective PRG, some basic steps are essential. The first step is to form a group of 3-5 APNs in the same specialty who have similar interests within their specialty. The next step is to elect a chair to serve a 1-year term. The chair then makes a yearly schedule so that members can plan to attend all PRG meetings. To meet the criterion of spending 40 hours in the PRG over 5 years, the group must meet for about 2 hours every 3 months.

At each meeting, members take turns serving as the contributor, who presents a case related to her work field. One week before the meeting, the contributor sends a recap of the case—along with corresponding literature, protocols, and guidelines—to PRG members so that they can read background material and analyze the case. Each case submitted for PR must have these elements:

• The patient’s presenting complaint, personal and family health history, and physical examination findings;

• An analysis of the case, with corresponding literature or guidelines to clarify or substantiate the diagnosis or the problem;

• A list of dilemmas that can occur or that did occur with the presented case, as well as learning points, and

• Learning objectives extracted from the presented case for discussion.

At the meeting, the contributor uses PowerPoint to present the case and then leads the discussion regarding dilemmas and learning goals. A member who is appointed secretary for each meeting takes notes and creates a report of the thoughts an views exchanged during the meeting. The report includes a summary of the case, the learning goals of the contributor, and feedback/recommendations from the group. After the meeting, the report is sent to the PRG members. Reports of PRG meetings are saved in a digital portfolio.

At the next PRG meeting, notes of the previous meeting are discussed. The chair asks the previous contributor whether she used feedback from the last PRG meeting and applied it to her practice. The process gives the contributor an opportunity to reflect on her own goals and improve the quality of her work.

Choosing the best method to present a case

Within the first year of the PRG’s existence, all five members had submitted a case. The group then met to determine the best format for presenting a case. The PRG considered three options: the testing method, the Balint method, and the research method. These methods were evaluated in terms of whether they enhanced the professionalism  the APN through the sharing of knowledge, expertise, and thoughts. The group was most satisfied with the testing method, which is particularly suitable for case study discussion and for evaluation of clinical guidelines and protocols. With this method, the group works together, sharing ideas and coming to an agreement on how practice can be improved. One downside of the testing method is that the personal learning goals of the APN are not included.

Gaining competencies

In the Netherlands, the focus of learning is to gain competencies. A framework used for the competency- based approach is that of the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) (Figure).9 The CanMEDS framework describes seven different roles of an HCP: professional, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, scholar, and, in the center, medical expert. APNs who have gained the first six competencies can become medical experts (the center of the honeycomb), but they cannot become medical experts if they fail to gain one of the six competencies surrounding the central competency. APNs need to enhance themselves in all seven competencies in order to become better HCPs.

Achieving the best practice

A combined framework using both the testing method and the CanMEDS framework was determined to be the best practice. This combined framework was deemed to be the best way to prepare a case for discussion and to give the PRG and the contributor the clearest insight into the question and learning issues provided by the case. The testing method is an ideal way to discuss problems or questions regarding certain procedures and guidelines within the safe confines of a group. In addition, each group member can impart information and share expertise via the group discussions, which can then be absorbed by the other members and translated into their own practices.

Discussion

The PRG found that, over a 4-year period, a combined approach—the testing method and the CanMEDS framework—constituted the best practice for structuring a case for discussion and determining the contributor’s own learning issues. The DNSRB also recommends use of CanMEDS competencies in this regard. If the combined framework does not work well for a given PRG, it may be related to poor group dynamics, lack of a safe environment, or a tendency for members discussing a case to highlight their feelings rather than their own practice. Some PRG members indicated that they sometimes felt vulnerable. It take courage to learn from colleagues. According to Karas-Irwin and Hoffmann,4 a caring environment imbued with genuine respect enhances PRG interactions. By participating in a PRG, APNs in the Netherlands not only meet the needs and criteria of the DNSRB, but also enhance their professional skills and build their knowledge base.

Implications for APNs in the United States

Although there is no specific requirement to participate in PR as part of APN licensure in the United States, PR is recognized as an important component of practice and professional responsibility. 10,11 The opportunity to come together as a small group of APNs with similar clinical practices and interests on a regular basis to review challenging cases provides a collegial environment for learning from each other. Peer assessments can play an important role in enhancing quality of care for complex patients with multiple interrelated chronic conditions, especially as seen in the U.S. with its aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity and its co-morbidities. =

Simone J. van der Linden is an APN in the Department of Hematology, Cancer Institute; Leni van Doorn is an APN in the Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute; Judith P. van Eck is an APN in the Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology; Wanda Geilvoet is an APN in the Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology; and Greta Mulders is an APN in the Department of Hematology, all at Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The authors state that they do not have a financial interest in or other relationship with any commercial product named in this article.

Acknowledgment

The authors thank L. Maas, RN, MS, Rotterdam University, Master’s in Advanced Nursing Practice Program, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

References

  1. Statistics Netherlands. Dutch population expected to reach 17.5 million in 2038. cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2008/2008-085-pb.htm
  2. Dutch Nursing Association.  2013. venvnvs.nl/files/2014/09/Jaarverslag-VVN-VS-okt13-okt14-def.pdf
  3.  Dutch Nursing Specialty Registration Board. Intercollegiale Toetsing Verpleegkundig Specialisten. 2010. verpleegkundigspecialismen.nl/Portals/45/20100203%20Intercollegiale%20Toetsing%20Verpleegkundig%20Specialisten%20_3.pdf

  4. Karas-Irwin BS, Hoffmann RL. Facing the facts: in-person peer review. Nurs Manage. 2014;45(11):14-17.
  5.  Sherwood GD, Brown M, Fay V, Wardell D. Defining nurse practitioner scope of practice: expanding primary care services. Internet J Adv Nurs Pract. 1997;1(2). geide.org/uploads/6/4/8/8/6488798/definingscope.pdf

  6. Smith MA, Atherly AJ, Kane RL, Pacala JT. Peer review of the quality of care. Reliability and sources of variability for outcome and process assessments. JAMA. 1997;278(19):1573-1578.

  7.  Spiva LA, Jarrell N, Baio P. The power of nursing peer review. J Nurs Adm. 2014;44(11):586-590.

  8. de Haan E. Leren met Collega’s.  Uitgeverij Van Gorcum;2009.
  9.  Frank JR, Jabbour M, Fréchette D, et al. Report of the CanMEDS Phase IV Working Groups. Ottawa, Canada:The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada;2005.
  10. National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Nurse Practitioner Core Competencies. 2012. c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.nonpf.org/resource/resmgr/competencies/npcorecompetenciesfinal2012.pdf

  11. National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health/Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner: Guidelines for Practice and Education, 7th Edition. Washington, DC: NPWH/AWHONN; 2014.

     

Doctoral degrees: Looking at the options

Nurse practitioners (NPs) may choose to return to graduate school for a variety of reasons. This choice may be fueled by a desire to teach, conduct research, improve the quality of healthcare and/or healthcare systems, or expand one’s knowledge base. In recent years, anticipation that, at some point in the future, a doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) would be the required degree for entry into advanced practice nursing has spurred many master’sprepared NPs to consider a doctoral degree. The decision to pursue any doctoral degree should be a thoughtful one based on specific career goals, knowledge about available options, and ability to commit the time, energy, and financial resources required.

A doctorate in nursing or education is a terminal degree, representing the highest level of formal education. Nurses with doctoral degrees are vital to the advancement of nursing science, nursing education, and patient and population health. In addition, doctorally prepared nurses are needed to meet future demands in education, policy development, and interdisciplinary collaboration with others in the healthcare community.1 In its 2011 landmark publication The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, the Institute of Medicine recommended that efforts be made to double the number of nurses with doctorates by 2020 to meet these demands.2 Doctoral options for NPs include a doctorate of philosophy (PhD) in nursing, the aforementioned DNP, and the doctorate of education (EdD). Each option has a different type of educational and outcomes focus.

PhD

The curriculum for the PhD in nursing focuses primarily on nursing theory, research, and the development of nursing knowledge and nursing science. An informal online review of PhD programs in each region of the United States revealed 36-47 as the typical range of credit hours needed to complete doctoral coursework. A dissertation is completed after doctoral coursework, with an additional 12-20 credits awarded for conducting and documenting a research study.

Most academic institutions offer part- and full-time study options. A PhD program takes 3-6 years to finish, with 7 years usually being the maximum time allowed for completion. Clinical hours are not a component of a PhD curriculum, but some mentored teaching experience may be included. The PhD curriculum typically includes courses focused on advanced qualitative and quantitative research methods, theory and knowledge development, and advanced healthcare statistics. Some PhD programs may require students to submit a scholarly portfolio that includes a résumé or curriculum vitae, accomplishments such as published works, continuing education hours earned, professional goals, and evaluation of those goals.

Many individuals with a PhD in nursing choose to teach in undergraduate- and/or graduate-level nursing programs. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), a PhD program should instillteaching, leadership, and mentorship skills, as well as interdisciplinary communication skills.3 One benefit of having a PhD in nursing is the opportunity to develop and participate in research specifically pertinent to nursing science. Although having a PhD degree is not essential in terms of obtaining funding for research from various sources or partnering with expert peers on scientific projects, it is certainly helpful.4 This research can directly affect nursing practice, health policy, and the formation of subsequent evidence-based theories.5 Nurses with PhD degrees who are employed in academic settings can enjoy professional growth, satisfaction, increased independence, and co-worker support.6, 7

Academic salaries for nurses with PhD degrees may not be competitive with those of faculty in other professionsor with those of nurses in clinical and administrative roles.7 This deficit may be somewhat balanced by an academic calendar and work schedule that allow time for thoughtful development and design of scholarly works. In addition, because of increased demand, PhD-prepared nurses may be able to negotiate their contract conditions and salaries upon hire. A global nursing faculty shortage exists because of an aging faculty, a reduced hiring pool of younger faculty, and increased dependence on adjunct faculty.NPs who choose to advance their education with a PhD will likely have a wide selection of positions to choose from and/or migrate to in the future. Some NPs with a PhD degree may find roles pertaining to a research specialty and becoming a nurse scientist appealing, whereas others may choose to remain in the academic setting. The ultimate goal of earning a PhD in nursing is to conduct research leading to the development or testing of theoretical frameworks and to contribute to nursing knowledge in areas such as health promotion, disease prevention, end-of-life care, and symptom and pain management in both acute and chronic illnesses.7

DNP

The DNP is the nursing doctorate degree that has gained a great deal of attention in recent years. The DNP curriculum prepares graduates to be clinical scholars and leaders in healthcare system change.5,9 Courses found in a typical DNP curriculum focus on epidemiology, health policy, evidence-based practice, societal health trends, quality improvement (QI), and patient safety. DNP program requirements include 1,000 post-baccalaureate clinical hours. Clinical hours completed in a master’s-degree program count toward this total. Students typically complete a comprehensive clinical- or community-based project. DNP programs can be completed on a part- or full-time basis depending on the options offered by each institution and individual student needs. Based on an unofficial online survey of DNP programs in each region of the U.S., the number of post-MSN credit hours ranges from 35 to 45 to obtain a DNP degree.

DNP graduates are prepared to provide the leadership to integrate evidence-based practice in providing care for patients, families, and populations for improved health outcomes.9  This degree prepares advanced practice nurses to continue working with patients in the clinical or community setting at the highest level of nursing practice. NPs with a DNP degree may be actively involved in strengthening healthcare through quality initiatives—that is, specific areas in which better nursing practice can make a difference in improving care. For example, quality initiatives in women’s health may involve maternal mortality, infant mortality, or preterm births. Quality initiatives encourage nurse leaders to get involved, partner with other disciplines, and further their understanding of the  healthcare system.10 DNP degrees may help facilitate parity of NPs with other healthcare professionals who need to earn doctoral degrees, improve the image of nursing, and attract more individuals to nursing, as well as increase the supply of faculty for clinical instruction in selected academic environments.10

Major concerns still need to be addressed regarding DNP education. DNP programs lack consistency with regard to what constitutes clinical hours to meet the 1,000- hour clinical requirement. The same concern exists for the scholarly projects required in most DNP programs.11 Project criteria vary widely, with some resembling research similar to a dissertation, others focusing on evidence-based QI endeavors, and still others consisting of an extensive literature review of a healthcare topic.

To address these concerns, AACN’s board created a task force in early 2014 to develop a white paper. In August 2015, AACN published The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Current Issues and Clarifying Recommendations: Report from the Task Force on the Implementation of the DNP.12 The white paper describes characteristics of the DNP project, practice experiences, and practice hours. It is anticipated that DNP programs will incorporate the task force’s recommendations into their curricula.

DNP-prepared NPs can prosper in primary care settings because of their patient-centered focus, and they can help alleviate the nursing faculty shortage, especially in the role of clinical instructor. DNP graduates can contribute to the academic setting, although some research-intensive institutions do not allow faculty with DNPs to enter tenure-track positions. A challenge for DNP-prepared NPs working in the healthcare setting may be the lack of knowledge that many current or potential employers have about the benefits that these providers can bring to the organization.13, 14 DNP educators and graduates need to educate healthcare organization employers in this regard. Studies that demonstrate improved healthcare and healthcare outcomes are important.

EdD

Nurse practitioners who want to develop skills in teaching, curriculum design, and evaluation might choose to obtain the EdD. This doctoral degree focuses on preparing graduates as education researchers and scholars to add to the body of knowledge and improve educational practices and outcomes. Some EdD programs have a nursing focus, but many of them are more generalized to include individuals from a variety of professions. A typical EdD curriculum ranges from 50 to 60 credit hours and includes courses addressing teaching and learning theories, educational trends, leadership, and research with a dissertation component. NPs who wish to work with students and influence the future of the nursing profession may choose this degree.14 The EdD degree can be completed in 3-4 years, but part- and full-time status requirements vary by school. NPs with an EdD degree can thrive in the academic setting because of their background in educational theory and applied teaching methods. EdD-prepared NPs may also hold educational leadership positions in healthcare systems and health-related business, not-for-profit, and governmental organizations.

Other considerations

Prospective doctoral students should consider several other factors when contemplating a terminal degree. Although time and cost may be primary considerations, NPs should evaluate circumstances surrounding their personal lives and individual goals. For instance, a spouse, children, and job demands can influence the decision to start a doctoral program. However, with self-evaluation and an understanding and encouraging support system, NPs pursuing doctoral education can thrive and adequately balance all aspects of their lives.

Another consideration is an individual’s learning needs and preferences. A doctoral program with classes offered solely at a university campus may benefit certain students, whereas others may be more successful with an exclusively online program. A program with live classes allows for in-person communication with professors and classmates, and can facilitate communication on an interdisciplinary level as well. NPs considering an online format will want to explore how professor and peer interaction is fostered through distance modalities. A major plus of an online program is that it can provide more flexibility with regard to a student’s work and family obligations. Hybrid programs with both live and online components are also widely available, and often provide some balance between the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Prospective doctoral students should examine a variety of schools for program format, curriculum requirements, and faculty expertise. Open houses and conferences offer multiple opportunities to learn more about various programs and ask questions to help determine the best path for each student. Once a student decides on pursuing a doctorate degree to become a researcher, clinician, or educator, finding a mentor already in the selected role can provide valuable guidance throughout the instruction and training process. In addition, NPs should explore part- and full-time option availability and accreditation status before choosing a program. AACN lists the main differences between the PhD and DNP degrees. In addition, AACN has compiled a list of Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)-accredited DNP programs with links to various schools’ websites (organized by state). Furthermore, AACN provides a comprehensive list of PhD and EdD programs with more detailed school and contact information. With regard to DNP programs, they should be both regionally and nationally accredited in order for students to obtain recognition for title and job purposes after graduation. The quality of a doctoral program can enhance the student experience and influence potential employers at the completion of the degree.

Conclusion

Nurse practitioners with doctoral degrees are needed in academic and patient education, research, health policy, and QI efforts. Many factors should be considered when choosing among options for doctoral degrees. NPs with a variety of doctoral degrees can complement each other and work together to further nursing education, implement changes, and favorably affect patient care outcomes.

Cathy R. Kessenich is Professor of Nursing and Department of Nursing Director at the University of Tampa in Tampa, Florida. Sasha T. Persaud works in pediatrics and is an MSN student and former graduate assistant in the nursing department at the University of Tampa. The authors state that they do not have a financial interest in or other relationship with any commercial product named in this article.

References

1. Fortier ME. So you want to get a doctorate. Am Nurse Today. 2013;8(5):41-44.

2. Institute of Medicine. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. 2010.

3. American Association of Colleges of Nursing. The Research-Focused Doctoral Program in Nursing: Pathways to Excellence. 2010.

4. Nardi DA, Gyurko CC. The global nursing faculty shortage: status and solutions for change. J Nurs Scholar. 2013;45(3):317-326.

5. Melnyk BM. Distinguishing the preparation and roles of doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice graduates: national implications for academic curricula and health care systems. J Nurs Educ. 2013;52(8):442-448.

6. Dreher HM, Glasgow MES, Cornelius FH, Bhattacharya A. A report on a national study of doctoral nursing faculty. Nurs Clin North Am. 2012;47(4):435-453.

7. McDermid F, Peters K, Jackson D, Daly J. Factors contributing to the shortage of nurse faculty: a review of the literature. Nurs Educ Today. 2012;32(5):565-569.

8. Duke University School of Nursing PhD Program.

9. Moore K. How DNP and PhD nurses can collaborate to maximize patient care. Am Nurse Today. 2014;9(1):48-49.

10. Dunbar-Jacob J, Nativio DG, Khalil H. Impact of doctor of nursing practice education in shaping health care systems for the future. J Nurs Educ. 2013;52(8):423-427.

11. Grey M. The doctor of nursing practice: defining the next steps. J Nurs Educ. 2013;52(8):462-465.

12. American Association of Colleges of Nursing. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: Current Issues and Clarifying Recommendations: Report from the Task Force on the Implementation of the DNP. August 2015.

13. Stoeckel P, Kruschke C. Practicing DNPs’ perceptions of the DNP. Clin Schol Rev. 2013;6(2):91-97.

14. Evans JD. Factors influencing recruitment and retention of nurse educators reported by current nurse faculty. J Prof Nurs. 2013;29(1):11-20.

Formation of a peer review group for advanced practice nurses

PDF 50

By Simone J. van der Linden, MANP, BEd, RN; Leni van Doorn, MSc, MANP, RN; Judith P. van Eck, MANP, RN; Wanda Geilvoet, MANP, RN; and Greta Mulders, MANP, RN

A group of Dutch advanced practice nurses (APNs) describe their process of forming a peer review group (PRG) to share cases and provide feedback to one another. The purpose of the PRG is to help APNs expand their knowledge base and hone their clinical skills, with the ultimate goal of improving patient care.

In 1996, Dr. Els Borst, former Minister of Health of the Netherlands, proposed that specially trained master’s-prepared nurses assume certain tasks of physicians in order to help meet the growing need for healthcare in the midst of a physician shortage. In light of the increased number of elderly and chronically ill patients today, this need is even more pressing.1 The consequence of Dr. Borst’s proposal was the inauguration of the first Master’s in Advanced Nursing Practice (MANP) program in Groningen, the Netherlands, at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences in 1997.

Since that time, the training and the work accountability of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the Netherlands have been extended. A major change occurred in March 2009, when Dutch APNs were granted official registration numbers and legal title protection. Nurses can be registered as APNs only after earning a master’s degree from a certified university and undergoing training on the job at a certified healthcare institute with a certified medical and nursing trainer.

Dutch APNs can be registered in one of five nursing specialties: (1) acute care in somatic disorders, (2) intensive care in somatic disorders, (3) chronic care in somatic disorders, (4) preventive care in somatic disorders and (5) mental health. Like physicians, APNs must attend conferences offering staff development workshops and be actively employed for at least 24 hours a week. In 2014, more than 2,500 APNs were registered in the Netherlands.2

After initial registration, APNs must re-register every 5 years to maintain an active license. Since 2010, one of the requisites for re-registration has been participation in peer review (PR). Guidelines of the Dutch Nursing Specialty Registration Board (DNSRB) require APNs to participate in a PR group (PRG) for at least 40 hours per 5-year period.3 In addition, to ensure competence and continuous professional development, periodic self-appraisal and peer feedback must be in place for all levels of nursing.4

Defining peer review

Peer review is a systematic process by which one assesses, monitors, and makes judgments about the quality of care provided to patients by others, as measured against established standards of practice.5,6 Nursing PR is an evaluation of one’s professional nursing practice, including identification of opportunities to improve care, by persons with the appropriate expertise to perform the evaluation.7 Because they undergo PR, APNs are a group of healthcare providers (HCPs) whose personal competencies in various nursing specialties are compared—with those of other APNs and with objective criteria—with the aim of improving daily practice.3 PR, recognized as a measure of accountability and a means to evaluate and improve practice,4 enhances development of the APN profession and improves the quality of patient care.

Peer review has multiple benefits for APNs. It facilitates an open and safe learning environment. It provides APNs with an opportunity to reflect on questions and problems together. Because of the interactive setting, APNs invariably learn something new.8 PR even offers APNs a break in an otherwise hectic workday. PR can help APNs evaluate the quality of care they have delivered, and gain insight into their greatest strengths and weaknesses as HCPs. With feedback and recommendations from the group, APNs can gain new knowledge and improve their skills.

Creating and working as a PRG

Because the APN profession is relatively new in the Netherlands, the nursing education department of the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam had no experience in starting or structuring a PRG. Five years ago, five pioneering APNs working on an internal medicine unit decided to create such a PRG. These APNs found several examples of PRGs in the literature and took the initiative in creating a framework, based on non-empirical research, that took into account the criteria requisites of the DNSRB.

To initiate an effective PRG, some basic steps are essential. The first step is to form a group of 3-5 APNs in the same specialty who have similar interests within their specialty. The next step is to elect a chair to serve a 1-year term. The chair then makes a yearly schedule so that members can plan to attend all PRG meetings. To meet the criterion of spending 40 hours in the PRG over 5 years, the group must meet for about 2 hours every 3 months.

At each meeting, members take turns serving as the contributor, who presents a case related to her work field. One week before the meeting, the contributor sends a recap of the case—along with corresponding literature, protocols, and guidelines—to PRG members so that they can read background material and analyze the case. Each case submitted for PR must have these elements:

  • The patient’s presenting complaint, personal and family health history, and physical examination findings;
  • An analysis of the case, with corresponding literature or guidelines to clarify or substantiate the diagnosis or the problem;
  • A list of dilemmas that can occur or that did occur with the presented case, as well as learning points, and
  • Learning objectives extracted from the presented case for discussion.

At the meeting, the contributor uses PowerPoint to present the case and then leads the discussion regarding dilemmas and learning goals. A member who is appointed secretary for each meeting takes notes and creates a report of the thoughts and views exchanged during the meeting. The report includes a summary of the case, the learning goals of the contributor, and feedback/recommendations from the group. After the meeting, the report is sent to the PRG members. Reports of PRG meetings are saved in a digital portfolio.

At the next PRG meeting, notes of the previous meeting are discussed. The chair asks the previous contributor whether she used feedback from the last PRG meeting and applied it to her practice. The process gives the contributor an opportunity to reflect on her own goals and improve the quality of her work.

Choosing the best method to present a case

Within the first year of the PRG’s existence, all five members had submitted a case. The group then met to determine the best format for presenting a case. The PRG considered three options: the testing method, the Balint method, and the research method. These methods were evaluated in terms of whether they enhanced the professionalism of the APN through the sharing of knowledge, expertise, and thoughts. The group was most satisfied with the testing method, which is particularly suitable for case study discussion and for evaluation of clinical guidelines and protocols. With this method, the group works together, sharing ideas and coming to an agreement on how practice can be improved. One downside of the testing method is that the personal learning goals of the APN are not included.

Gaining competencies

In the Netherlands, the focus of learning is to gain competencies. A framework used for the competency-based approach is that of the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) (Figure).9 The CanMEDS framework describes seven different roles of an HCP: professional, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, scholar, and, in the center, medical expert. APNs who have gained the first six competencies can become medical experts (the center of the honeycomb), but they cannot become medical experts if they fail to gain one of the six competencies surrounding the central competency. APNs need to enhance themselves in all seven competencies in order to become better HCPs.

Figure

Achieving the best practice

A combined framework using both the testing method and the CanMEDS framework was determined to be the best practice. This combined framework was deemed to be the best way to prepare a case for discussion and to give the PRG and the contributor the clearest insight into the questions and learning issues provided by the case. The testing method is an ideal way to discuss problems or questions regarding certain procedures and guidelines within the safe confines of a group. In addition, each group member can impart information and share expertise via the group discussions, which can then be absorbed by the other members and translated into their own practices.

Discussion

The PRG found that, over a 4-year period, a combined approach—the testing method and the CanMEDS framework—constituted the best practice for structuring a case for discussion and determining the contributor’s own learning issues. The DNSRB also recommends use of CanMEDS competencies in this regard. If the combined framework does not work well for a given PRG, it may be related to poor group dynamics, lack of a safe environment, or a tendency for members discussing a case to highlight their feelings rather than their own practice. Some PRG members indicated that they sometimes felt vulnerable. It takes courage to learn from colleagues. According to Karas-Irwin and Hoffmann,4 a caring environment imbued with genuine respect enhances PRG interactions. By participating in a PRG, APNs in the Netherlands not only meet the needs and criteria of the DNSRB, but also enhance their professional skills and build their knowledge base.

Implications for APNs in the United States

Although there is no specific requirement to participate in PR as part of APN licensure in the United States, PR is recognized as an important component of practice and professional responsibility.10,11 The opportunity to come together as a small group of APNs with similar clinical practices and interests on a regular basis to review challenging cases provides a collegial environment for learning from each other. Peer assessments can play an important role in enhancing quality of care for complex patients with multiple interrelated chronic conditions, especially as seen in the U.S. with its aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity and its co-morbidities.

Simone J. van der Linden is an APN in the Department of Hematology, Cancer Institute; Leni van Doorn is an APN in the Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Institute; Judith P. van Eck is an APN in the Department of Medicine, Section of Endo­crinology; Wanda Geilvoet is an APN in the Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology; and Greta Mulders is an APN in the Department of Hematology, all at Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The authors state that they do not have a financial interest in or other relationship with any commercial product named in this article.

Acknowledgment
The authors thank L. Maas, RN, MS, Rotterdam University, Master’s in Advanced Nursing Practice Program, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

References
1. Statistics Netherlands. Dutch population expected to reach 17.5 million in 2038. cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/
bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2008/2008-085-pb.htm

2. Dutch Nursing Association. 2013. venvnvs.nl/files/2014/09/Jaarverslag-VVN-VS-okt13-okt14-def.pdf

3. Dutch Nursing Specialty Registration Board. Intercollegiale Toetsing Verpleegkundig Specialisten. 2010.
verpleegkundigspecialismen.nl/Portals/45/20100203%20Intercollegiale%20Toetsing%20Verpleegkundig%20
Specialisten%20_3.pdf

4. Karas-Irwin BS, Hoffmann RL. Facing the facts: in-person peer review. Nurs Manage. 2014;45(11):14-17.

5. Sherwood GD, Brown M, Fay V, Wardell D. Defining nurse practitioner scope of practice: expanding primary care services. Internet J Adv Nurs Pract. 1997;1(2). geide.org/uploads/6/4/8/8/6488798/definingscope.pdf

6. Smith MA, Atherly AJ, Kane RL, Pacala JT. Peer review of the quality of care. Reliability and sources of variability for outcome and process assessments. JAMA. 1997;278(19):1573-1578.

7. Spiva LA, Jarrell N, Baio P. The power of nursing peer review. J Nurs Adm. 2014;44(11):586-590.

8. de Haan E. Leren met Collega’s. Uitgeverij Van Gorcum; 2009.

9. Frank JR, Jabbour M, Fréchette D, et al. Report of the CanMEDS Phase IV Working Groups. Ottawa, Canada: The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada; 2005.

10. National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Nurse Practitioner Core Competencies. 2012. c.ymcdn.com/
sites/www.nonpf.org/resource/resmgr/competencies/npcorecompetenciesfinal2012.pdf

11. National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health/Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner: Guidelines for Practice and Education, 7th Edition. Washington, DC: NPWH/AWHONN; 2014.

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